Clinical Studies Related To Oxygen Enhanced Exercise and Rest

STUDIES OVERVIEW - No Prescription Needed.  We do not supply those who have been prescribed oxygen.

To save your time you may use CONTROL FIND (C F) to locate your special interest. Because oxygen affects EVERYTHING, and if you do not find it, understand it is only because we have not had the time to add it and request you email mike@breathing.com for relevant studies. 
Scroll down to begin with Warburg Hypothesis 
 

Immunological mechanisms of the antitumor effects of supplemental oxygenation.  Paving the way for intratumoral T cells   https://stm.sciencemag.org/content/7/277/277ra30  
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Long-lasting improvement of physical endurance following oxygen-multistep-therapy

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6711017
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EXERCISE AND THE IMMUNE SYSTEM  
https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007165.htm

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Increasing mental performance by multistep oxygen therapy. Computer-assisted measurements of information processing capacity, intelligence, short-term memory and further parameters of cerebral performance.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2711706
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Penile oxygen saturation in the flaccid and erect penis in men and without erectile dysfunction

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17021333

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Age-dependence of oxygen transport into body tissues and the favorable modification of this transport by multistep oxygen therapy. 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6475110 

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The Connection Between Oxygen and Diabetes
https://health.ucsd.edu/news/releases/Pages/2014-06-05-connection-between-oxygen-and-diabetes.aspx
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Control and usefulness of a capillary-wall switch mechanism in blood microcirculation. Recent results of oxygen multistep therapy research.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3705655
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'Results of multistep oxygen therapy in the treatment of sudden hearing loss.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1930489 
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Anticancer strategies to progress in tumor immunology.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3367808
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General cancer prevention, metastasis prevention and the combination of classical cancer therapies with O2 multistep immunostimulation
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3548643
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Hyperoxia for performance and training
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2911591
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Highs and lows of hyperoxia: physiological, performance, and clinical aspects. 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29488785

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Increase in the short-term memory capacity by 19-23%|
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2711706?ordinalpos=9&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_R...|
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MALE CYCLISTS' ENHANCED PERFORMANCE 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4996887/---
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Fundamentals of combating cancer metastasis by oxygen multistep immunostimulation processes.  The Warburg Effect
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3892251 
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Oxygen  Enhanced Immunostimulation processes. 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3892251  
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Cycling performance improved with acute exposure to hyperoxia.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30676139 |
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CYSTIC FIBROSIS  WITH SEVERE PULMONARY DISEASE   https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012369216331208 
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Exercise training and recovery supplemented with hyperoxic gas appears to have a beneficial effect on subsequent exercise performance|
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28975517 
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Double-blind study on the long-lasting improvement of physical endurance following oxygen-multistep-therapy.  
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6711017
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Brain Function Enhancement Potential
https://neurosciencenews-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/neurosciencenews.com/exercise-intensity-brain-15610/amp/

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OXYGEN ENHANCED EXERCISE AND ENDURANCE.
In patients with PAH/CTEPH, breathing oxygen-enriched air provides major increases in exercise performance

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28329240}
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Oxygen enhanced exercise improves cognitive performance and exercise tolerancehttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28575566
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ENERGY COST under hyperoxia influenced by reduced metabolic demands. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29914562 
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Hyperoxia likely restored performance due to maintenance of oxygen availability
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29672229 
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Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized from l‐arginine by NO synthases, plays a role in adaptation to physical exercise by modulating blood flow, muscular contraction and glucose uptake and in the control of cellular respiration. learn more  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1748-1716.2007.01713.x  
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Hyperoxia enhances self- paced exercise performance   https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31290172 
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Increased critical power during supine cycling. 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31054263 
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Maximal oxygen uptake significantly improved in both groups. However, blood lactate curve during submaximal exercise test significantly improved only in the HST group.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31359633 
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 hyperoxia on repeated sprint cycling performance & muscle fatigue 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31337587 
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Hyperoxia speeds pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics and increases critical power during supine cycling.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31054263 
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High-intensity interval training and hyperoxia during chemotherapy: A case report about the feasibility, safety and physical functioning in a colorectal cancer patient.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29901612   

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Effect of breathing oxygen-enriched air on exercise performance in patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension:   https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28329240 
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intermittent hypoxia-hyperoxia training in coronary artery disease patients:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28323322 
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Aerobic efficiency is associated with the improvement in maximal power output during acute hyperoxia  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28108650 
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Mechanisms of Improved Exercise Performance under Hyperoxia.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28068656 
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Hyperoxia Extends Time to Exhaustion During High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise: a Randomized, Crossover Study in Male Cyclists.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27747789 
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Role of CO2 in the cerebral hyperemic response to incremental normoxic and hyperoxic exercise.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26769951 
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Hyperoxia increases arterial oxygen pressure during exercise in type 2 diabetes patients: a feasibility study.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26744210   
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Recovery effects of repeated exposures to normobaric hyperoxia on local muscle fatigue. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24476781 

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Redox basis of exercise physiology 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32192916   See MOXY
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Intramuscular mechanisms of overtraining 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32179050   See MOXY

 MITOCHONDRIA
"If there's one thing that mitochondria thrive on, its oxygen. All of it is consumed by cytochrome oxidase, the last enzyme in the electron transport chain which drives ATP production. If cells relied on diffusion alone to supply them with their oxygen needs, then there would not be enough to keep up with demand. So oxygen carrying molecules, such as hemoglobin and myoglobin transport oxygen to where it is needed...  As oxygen travels through the body it exerts a pressure in the mixture of gases in the lungs, or in solution, known as the partial pressure. Oxygen bound to hemoglobin in the blood diffuses down a steep pressure gradient into tissues as blood travels through capillaries. Next oxygen diffuses into the mitochondria."  From a 2007 edition of the Journal of Experimental Biology (O2 Uptake in Mitochondria)

"It has been shown that 95% of all oxygen utilized in the body is involved with a subcellular structure known as mitochondria."  Taken from the transcript of a lecture given by Dr. Roger Orth (The Role of Mitochondria in Aging)

"Most of the energy for endurance exercise comes from oxidation of fuel. The maximal capacity of an individual to consume oxygen is therefore one of the important factors limiting endurance performance. Mitochondrial DNA is of particular interest, because it contains the genes for several enzymes involved in oxygen consumption."  From a 2001 issue of Sportscience (Mitochondrial DNA and Maximum Oxygen Consumption)

"Mitochondria play a central role in cell life and cell death. An increasing number of studies place mitochondrial dysfunction at the heart of disease, most notably in the heart and the central nervous system. That we must breathe oxygen to stay alive is simply the consequence of the demand of our mitochondria for oxygen. About 98% of inhaled oxygen is consumed by mitochondria, and without mitochondria, we would have no need of the oxygen transfer machinery of the lungs, red cells, hemoglobin, or even the circulatory system that delivers oxygen to the tissues. Similarly, the organization of food intake, digestion, and processing is designed primarily to supply substrates destined for mitochondrial oxidation. Consider then how much of the physiology of higher organisms is dictated by the demand of our mitochondria for a supply of oxygen."  From the February 2004 issue of the medical journal Diabetes (Roles of Mitochondria in Health and Disease)

"During the last 20 years, gerontological studies have revealed different molecular pathways involved in the ageing process and pointed out mitochondria as one of the key regulators of longevity. Increasing age in mammals correlates with increased levels of mitochondrial DNA mutations and a deteriorating respiratory chain function."  From the July 2010 issue of Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics (Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism and Ageing)

"It is generally accepted that mitochondria play an important role in cancer through replication and energy production.   By oxidizing (losing an electron) the fat, protein, and carbohydrates we consume through food and drink, they create energy-abundant molecules (ATP) for the cell through biochemical processes known as cellular respiration. Normal cells produce energy through mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). When oxygen is not available, they produce energy via the less efficient route of anaerobic glycolysis. In the 1920s, Otto Warburg observed that cancer cells do not produce energy in the efficient way that normal cells do. Rather, cancer cells produce most of their energy through an inefficient, high rate of glycolysis followed by fermentation of lactate into lactic acid.  Glucose is then diverted from producing ATP to a process to promote cell proliferation. This process was coined by Warburg himself as aerobic fermentation, which has been adapted to 'aerobic glycolysis', and commonly known as the Warburg Effect.  All evidence supports the Warburg effect - whether causal or not - as constant in the initiation and/or progression of cancer."    Dr. Michael Karlfeldt from the September 2018 issue of the Townsend Letter (The Link Between Cancer and Mitochondria: Restoring Mitochondrial Function to Fight Cancer)

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